High-ranking auto executive fired

An employer can fire an employee for cause if the employee is dishonest. But the dishonesty can't be superficial and has to go to the heart of the employment relationship. A recent case out of Windsor, Ont., involving a senior executive at DaimlerChrysler is an example of misconduct that rises to the level of warranting dismissal. It also raised an interesting question regarding how employers treat workers at the time of dismissal when they have just cause.
By Todd Humber
|Canadian Employment Law Today

An employer can fire an employee for cause if the employee is dishonest. But the dishonesty can’t be superficial, and has to go to the heart of the employment relationship. In 2001, the Supreme Court of Canada rejected an absolute rule entitling an employer to dismiss an employee for every act of dishonesty no matter how minor. Instead, the court said it’s more appropriate to strike a balance between the severity of the misconduct and the sanction imposed.

A recent case out of Windsor, Ont., involving a senior executive at DaimlerChrysler is an example of misconduct that rises to the level of warranting dismissal. It also raised an interesting question regarding how employers treat workers at the time of dismissal when they have just cause.

A high-ranking DaimlerChrysler executive in Windsor, Ont., was fired for cause after he hid information from the automotive giant during an investigation into improper billings by one of its suppliers.